A little trick for saving your hands

DSCF1006

My hands are my most important tool. When I get a cut on my hand I feel impatient as a band aid reduces my sensitivity, and seems to get in the way of all that I do. I sometimes overwork my hands, and create skin cracks or sensitive spots. It is so hard to be patient and let my hands heal. I have found a product that helps in some circumstances.

DSCF1034New Skin liquid bandage is my little secret. It won’t work for those deeper cuts that need a serious bandage. In that case I turn to band aids with flexible fabric, which aren’t as bulky feeling and stretch against the contours of the skin better than regular band aids. I know that this sounds like a commercial, but New Skin is a genius of an idea. You paint it on your boo-boo. It protects it from dirt and air and light abrasion. I tried other brands, but have found that this one creates a more resilient skin barrier after one or two coats than the spray kind.

DSCF1030New Skin comes in handy when I have a sore spot, as in the case of using this rug hooking tool. I get going with such vigor, and the tip continuously hits against my other hand’s forefinger as I am feeding the hook the strip of wool. I try to go slower and not hit that spot, but I guess I like to torture myself and keep the repetition  going through the pain. A protective layer of liquid band-aid sure does help my finger as I continue to hook.

DSCF1027Here I am knitting. I just got these fabulous Sunstruck knitting needles from Knitpicks for Christmas. The great thing about them is the nice and pointy tips, which make it easy to make stitches. After knitting about a million stitches going at a clip, my forefinger starts getting very sore. That’s another job for New Skin. A coat or two will reduce sensitivity without giving you that band-aid feeling. And I am good to go.

DSCF1012Liquid bandage also helps with little cracks in the skin and keeps me sewing. I know I should use a thimble, but I find them hard to get used to in some applications.

DSCF1004_2Another time my hands get a beating is when I am plying yarn on the spinning wheel and the threads start to be wearing on my skin after 350 yards pass over my fingers. Do I want to stop? No. Not moi!

DSCF1041DSCF1028

Gardening is another time that I can’t be bothered with band aids. A protective coating is often all that I need under my gardening gloves. Now I could take a break from handiwork. Read a book. Stare at the computer. But I really would rather be creating. I suppose I could go shopping for more supplies. That definitely is a genius of a runner-up idea.

DSCF1033

Keep this on your shelf as part of your tool kit. Your hands will love you and your creative heart will be happy.

Have a happy day ~ Karen

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “A little trick for saving your hands

  1. For the deeper cuts such as the ones that open on fingers during cold weather, a dermatologist told me to use a drop of super glue. It helps the cut to heal from the inside out. It would be like Newskin, but a bit stronger.

    Like

  2. Thanks so much for the good advice–I will surely look for the “new skin”–as I too get sore spots, and cracks that are hard to fix with a band aid–
    Love the scarf you’re knitting!
    Today I’m Bird Watching as part of the Great Backyard Watchers this weekend.
    Jean

    Like

  3. Karen, I have used this New Skin for years as has my husband. It is a great product.
    Love your rugs. As it happens I am working on one of your patterns right now.
    Have a good weekend. Anne

    Like

  4. We have been using this preparation for years now. The only thing is you have to spray it on let it dry and reapply otherwise it doesn’t really hold. It has great healing properties.

    I have been complaining about my hands lately. They seem quite achy but nothing that will prevent me from hooking or knitting.

    Like

  5. I use it all the time for exactly the same reasons! Love it. My daughter is a nurse and told me that is what she uses. I especially love or on the ends of my thumbs when they split and are so very painful.

    Like

  6. Thanks for all the information. I also have used this for years but never thought about it for my sore fingers during knitting, sewing,or hooking!!! We learn something new every day!! Isn’t It wonderful?!!

    Like

  7. I have been using this for a few years, too. When I use it on the deep cracks on my fingertips, it burns a little at first, but it helps a lot. My dog hates the smell!

    Like

  8. Karen, sorry to change the subject, but what month was the spiral chair mat? I was telling a few ladies about it and now can’t find it on your blog. Thanks.

    Like

  9. I love the idea to use this product as a “buffer” – my kids use it on their feet when running blisters pop up. This Mom’s not a runner so I’ve never thought to use it for some other purpose! Thanks. ~Ann

    Like

  10. I’ve used this product occasionally for cuts but never thought of using it as protection on sore spots…thanks, will try it soon!
    But on the pointy needles: I knit socks on very pointy-points, and have to retrain myself every now and then to push the knitting, instead of pushing the needle tip. 100% prevention.

    Like

  11. I love this tip! Thank you, so much! The skin on my thumb cracks frequently and I use superglue for repairs. The trouble is, superglue dries up in its container more quickly than I can use it all, and I hate that kind of waste! I used to use New Skin on my feet when I was a ballet dancer in high school, but forgot all about it. I’m so glad you brought it back to my attention ~ I’ll be picking up a bottle right quick!

    have a good day, Karen!

    rebecca

    Like

  12. Now is there a hand lotion for dry hands and something for finger nails. I find when I hook my hands get really dry, don’t know if it is the wool or the dye in the wool.

    Love your blog Karen

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s